Posts Tagged ‘raffles’

Raffle Ticket Sales: Working from the Top Down

Wednesday, September 7th, 2011

If you’re really looking to sell as many raffle tickets as you can and raise a significant amount of money for your cause or organization, it’s important to develop a strategy before your sellers set foot out the door. Without such a game plan, you won’t be able to get the full potential out of your fundraising efforts.

One major thing you can do to put your energies to best use is to target community leaders first. Determine who some of the most influential people are locally, then send your best sellers to make the pitch. Not only should you try to get these key players to buy tickets themselves, but you should try to enlist their help in selling more tickets. Even if they’re not willing to appeal to their networks on your behalf, you may be able to get their permission to use their name when approaching other potential ticket buyers. For example, “Mayor Smith himself just bought 20 tickets,” is a great opener.

So who might some of these head honchos be? Local politicians, leaders of religious organizations, school administrators, Rotary Club members and local sports heroes all fit the bill. Talk to your team and see who already has connections with some of these people and begin networking.

Thanking Raffle Donors

Thursday, September 1st, 2011

There are many follow-up tasks to a successfully concluded raffle, from delivering prizes to winners to filling out any necessary legal or tax forms. One item that you should make an effort not to forget is thanking your raffle prize donors. If an individual or organization has been generous enough to give your cause a prize to raffle off, a show of gratitude is definitely in order.

Your gratitude can take many forms: everything from a simple Thank You card to a gift certificate or other small token of appreciation. When choosing your method, keep in mind the nature of the donation as well as of the relationship between your organization and the donor. A thank you to a parent who donates a gift basket to a school fundraiser will probably look different from a thank you to a major corporation that has donated a car to a cancer charity.

Laws About What to Print on Your Raffle Tickets

Thursday, August 4th, 2011

Did you know that some states have specific laws regulating what information you need to print on the raffle tickets you sell? In New Hampshire, for example, the law states, “All raffle tickets shall be printed with the name of the charitable organization thereon, the date and place of the drawing, and the prize or prizes to be awarded and the amount of the donation.”

That’s why you need to make sure not just to research whether or not raffles are legal in your state (for help with that, check out our post on State-by-State Raffle Laws), but also the specific details of the law. It may be a pain to read through all the small print, but you’ll be kicking yourself if you don’t and you get entangled legally.

Summer Flower Raffle

Tuesday, July 19th, 2011

There are few things that will perk up someone’s day than receiving a beautiful bouquet of flowers.  The bring so much joy and happiness to the receiver.  Even potted or hanging plants are just as beautiful, and are readily available.  I have a great idea for a raffle fundraiser involving summer flowers for any group that is fundraising this summer.

The idea is to raffle off summer flower bouquets deliveries.  Contact a local nursery or florist that will sell you flowers at a discount since you will be ordering a lot of them. Send order forms and raffle tickets home with the people doing the fundraising so that people can either buy a raffle ticket to have a bouquet sent to them or another person, or they can just order flowers that they want through you.  Either way, it is a great way to raise money for your cause.

Some fantastic summer flowers to include in your raffle/fundraiser are Asters, Birds of Paradise, Calla Lilies, Chrysanthemums, Casa Blanca Lilies, Daisies, Geraniums, Orchids, Pansies, etc.  The possibilities of arrangements could even been made to order as well!

Raffle Prize Ideas Over $100

Friday, July 15th, 2011

If you can afford to spend over $100 on a raffle prize, congratulations! You should have no problem offering a prize that will tempt people to buy your raffle tickets. There are of course almost a limitless number of possibilities once you get up into higher budget brackets, but here are just a few ideas, some that are not too far-fetched, and some really luxurious prizes.

  • Cash—Who can resist a hefty cash prize? Paying even as much as $10 for a raffle ticket when you might be rewarded with $500 doesn’t sound like such a bad idea. If you offer a large cash prize and are going to be charging a fair amount for tickets, though, make sure to offer some smaller, runner-up prizes, too.
  • Computers—Computers or computer peripherals make great prizes. A brand new laptop sounds good to just about any demographic. To really lure ticket buyers, consider raffling off some of the newest tech, like an iPad. It’s something many people wouldn’t buy outright, but would love to win.
  • Electronics—There are of course many other types of electronics you can raffle as well. Smart phones, GPS devices, ebook readers and MP3 players are just a few of your options.
  • Event tickets–We mentioned event tickets in our post on raffle prizes under $100, but if your budget’s a little bigger you can get tickets to more expensive events or offer premium seats or elite access.
  • Travel—And now we get into REALLY premium prizes. Travel is of course a popular prize for many types of contests. You could pick a popular destination such as Hawaii, a unique experience like an overnight train trip down the Pacific coast, or an adventurous getaway like a whitewater rafting trip in the Grand Canyon. The key here is to know your audience and pick an appropriate prize.
  • Cars—If you want to offer a car as a raffle prize, it’s going to involve some serious money or a very generous donation. You’ll also have to weave your way through the vagaries of tax law. So you’ll need to consider carefully before opting for this one.
  • Houses—A dream house of course couldn’t be left off the list. They’re very popular prizes these days and bound to draw ticket buyers. However, house raffles can be even more problematic than car raffles, and many states have specific laws about this particular prize.

Whether you decide to raffle off a house or a computer, there are bound to be people who won’t be particularly interested in that specific prize, no matter how much it’s worth. So our final word of advice is to offer a cash option to your winners.

Store Entrances: Prime Real Estate for Raffle Ticket Sales

Wednesday, July 6th, 2011

There are quite a few ways you can go about selling raffle tickets to people who don’t know your organization. One of the best ways for small and large organizations alike is to set up a table at the entrance to a high-traffic location, like a large store or shopping center. Thankfully, this is fairly easy to pull off.

The first thing you need to do is talk to the owner of the location. Explain to them the cause you’re raising funds for as well as talk to them about times to set up a table. (Get them on your side, and they may even be willing to help out with some sort of matching donation.) Aim for times when lots of people will be visiting the location. For instance, if you’re setting up shop at a grocery store, sell tickets on Saturday afternoon or around rush hour during the week when people are making a quick stop for groceries on their way home.

Once you’ve gotten permission to sell, design your stand for success. Make clear, easy-to-read signs on all sides of the table from which large numbers of people are likely to approach. Most people will make the decision to buy or not before ever approaching the table. Explain the cause you’re raising money for as well as the cool prizes. Ask for people’s help.

Finally, make sure whoever mans your stand has a cheery disposition and enthusiasm for the cause. People are much more likely to approach and buy from a happy volunteer than a gloomy employee who’s been roped into it.

State-by-State Raffle Laws

Wednesday, June 22nd, 2011

Raffles, even for charity, are illegal in many states. Before you begin planning one for your organization, make sure you look into the relevant gaming laws. Here we’ve provided links to the most up-to-date information for all 50 states plus Washington, D.C. These laws are subject to change, so we’ve also provided the name of the government body on whose site we found the information.

Raffle Prize Ideas Under $50

Wednesday, June 15th, 2011

$50 is a great target price for a raffle prize if you’re running a smaller raffle or want to offer numerous prizes. It allows you to buy one relatively nice single item, or combine a few different things into a prize package. If bundling, take a look at our post on Raffle Prize Ideas Under $25 for suggestions.

  • Gift Baskets—If you’ve got at least $50 to play with, you can put together a very nice gift basket. Some ideas for themes include bath and body products, baby care items, food, school supplies, makeup, gourmet food and kitchen gear.
  • Tools/Supplies—This one’s closely related to gift baskets. If the people you’ll be selling most of your raffle tickets to have a similar hobby or profession, put together a collection of tools or supplies that appeals specifically to them. For instance, if you’re holding an art fundraiser, bundle together some brushes, pastels or other art supplies.
  • Games/Board Games—Many computer, board and other games are available for under $50. Even the most popular board games, such as Settlers of Catan, won’t blow your budget.
  • DVD Box Sets—You can get almost any TV series box set and some movie trilogies for under $50. HBO in particular has some great miniseries available.
  • Software—There’s some great software out there in this price range. Go for fun or go for useful. For the former, check out things like Living Cookbook, Family Tree Maker or The Complete National Geographic. The latest addition of Quicken, Norton AntiVirus or TurboTax would be good for the latter.
  • Gift Cards—Gift cards continue to be great at any price range. $50 could get someone a nice dinner for two or a super nice dinner for one!

Concert Tickets

Wednesday, June 1st, 2011

This weekend I’m heading to see my favorite band in concert, and guess how I got the tickets? Yep, that’s right, a raffle. I’m ecstatic, because the concert was completely sold out. This is the first time I’ll have been to see them play in three years. I would have paid way more than the $5 I did for the raffle ticket.

This is why concert tickets (or event tickets of any type, for that matter) make such a fantastic raffle prize. If you’re located anywhere near a major city, there’s bound to be some concert or event that people are interested in going on at any time. You can pick the event to fit the group of people you plan to sell tickets to. Classical music, rock concerts, folk festivals—you name it. If you plan your raffle far enough in advance, you can buy tickets that will be sold out by the time it rolls around, and people will jump at the chance to win.

Even if the tickets are for a concert that’s not likely to sell out, people will buy them for a chance at a fun weekend they wouldn’t pay full price for. Throw in VIP passes to sweeten the deal if you think it needs it. Depending on the band or event, the organizers might even be willing to donate tickets for a good cause, or at least the VIP passes.

Good Record Keeping: Key to Raffle Success

Thursday, May 19th, 2011

We can’t stress enough how important good record keeping is to running a successful raffle. This is especially important if you’re running a fairly sizable event and so have many tickets and many ticket sellers. If you don’t keep careful track of things, you can quickly find yourself in an awkward position with unpaid-for tickets, misplaced money and unhappy ticket holders. Here are a few tips on keeping things organized.

  1. Buy numbered raffle tickets. That way you can record which tickets you give to which sellers, and they can even keep track of who they sell to.
  2. Make sure you have a solid system for money collection in place. Even the most well-intentioned volunteer seller can forget to turn in money or lose an envelope if you don’t.
  3. Hold a kickoff meeting with your sellers to make sure they know all the rules and prices for the raffle. If they’re confused, your ticket buyers will be, too.
  4. Make sure sellers turn in all unsold raffle tickets when it comes time for the raffle drawing. Make sure that the money you’ve collected is in line with the number of tickets sold.