Posts Tagged ‘raffle’

Raffle Ticket Sales: Working from the Top Down

Wednesday, September 7th, 2011

If you’re really looking to sell as many raffle tickets as you can and raise a significant amount of money for your cause or organization, it’s important to develop a strategy before your sellers set foot out the door. Without such a game plan, you won’t be able to get the full potential out of your fundraising efforts.

One major thing you can do to put your energies to best use is to target community leaders first. Determine who some of the most influential people are locally, then send your best sellers to make the pitch. Not only should you try to get these key players to buy tickets themselves, but you should try to enlist their help in selling more tickets. Even if they’re not willing to appeal to their networks on your behalf, you may be able to get their permission to use their name when approaching other potential ticket buyers. For example, “Mayor Smith himself just bought 20 tickets,” is a great opener.

So who might some of these head honchos be? Local politicians, leaders of religious organizations, school administrators, Rotary Club members and local sports heroes all fit the bill. Talk to your team and see who already has connections with some of these people and begin networking.

Summer Flower Raffle

Tuesday, July 19th, 2011

There are few things that will perk up someone’s day than receiving a beautiful bouquet of flowers.  The bring so much joy and happiness to the receiver.  Even potted or hanging plants are just as beautiful, and are readily available.  I have a great idea for a raffle fundraiser involving summer flowers for any group that is fundraising this summer.

The idea is to raffle off summer flower bouquets deliveries.  Contact a local nursery or florist that will sell you flowers at a discount since you will be ordering a lot of them. Send order forms and raffle tickets home with the people doing the fundraising so that people can either buy a raffle ticket to have a bouquet sent to them or another person, or they can just order flowers that they want through you.  Either way, it is a great way to raise money for your cause.

Some fantastic summer flowers to include in your raffle/fundraiser are Asters, Birds of Paradise, Calla Lilies, Chrysanthemums, Casa Blanca Lilies, Daisies, Geraniums, Orchids, Pansies, etc.  The possibilities of arrangements could even been made to order as well!

Raffle Prize Ideas Under $100

Wednesday, June 29th, 2011

When you hit the $100 range for your prize budget, you can offer some really attractive items. Here are just a few of the awesome things you can offer to tempt people to buy your raffle tickets.

  • Small Appliances–Almost any group of potential raffle ticket buyers is likely to have some gourmands or home chefs in it. That makes small appliances a great prize idea for almost any organization running a raffle. I know I’d buy a ticket for a chance at a cappuccino machine, breadmaker or juicer.
  • Jewelry/Watches–If you’re organization’s audience is largely female, go for some nice jewelry. If male, opt for a watch. There are plenty of beautiful options out there for either that will keep you under $100, from pearl earrings to diamond pendants to Seiko watches.
  • Electronics–There are lots of cool gadgets and electronic accessories out there in this price range. Some options include iPod docks, mini camcorders and even some Blu-Ray players.
  • Tools–If you’ve got a do-it-yourselfer audience, tools are an ideal idea. Check out power drills, dremels and soldering equipment, all within your budget.
  • Cookware–Some deluxe cookware makes a nice addition to anyone’s kitchen. Appeal to your audience with cookware sets, canners, dutch ovens and griddles galore!

If none of these strike your fancy, see our posts on prizes in the $25 and $50 ranges as well.

State-by-State Raffle Laws

Wednesday, June 22nd, 2011

Raffles, even for charity, are illegal in many states. Before you begin planning one for your organization, make sure you look into the relevant gaming laws. Here we’ve provided links to the most up-to-date information for all 50 states plus Washington, D.C. These laws are subject to change, so we’ve also provided the name of the government body on whose site we found the information.

Raffle Prize Ideas Under $50

Wednesday, June 15th, 2011

$50 is a great target price for a raffle prize if you’re running a smaller raffle or want to offer numerous prizes. It allows you to buy one relatively nice single item, or combine a few different things into a prize package. If bundling, take a look at our post on Raffle Prize Ideas Under $25 for suggestions.

  • Gift Baskets—If you’ve got at least $50 to play with, you can put together a very nice gift basket. Some ideas for themes include bath and body products, baby care items, food, school supplies, makeup, gourmet food and kitchen gear.
  • Tools/Supplies—This one’s closely related to gift baskets. If the people you’ll be selling most of your raffle tickets to have a similar hobby or profession, put together a collection of tools or supplies that appeals specifically to them. For instance, if you’re holding an art fundraiser, bundle together some brushes, pastels or other art supplies.
  • Games/Board Games—Many computer, board and other games are available for under $50. Even the most popular board games, such as Settlers of Catan, won’t blow your budget.
  • DVD Box Sets—You can get almost any TV series box set and some movie trilogies for under $50. HBO in particular has some great miniseries available.
  • Software—There’s some great software out there in this price range. Go for fun or go for useful. For the former, check out things like Living Cookbook, Family Tree Maker or The Complete National Geographic. The latest addition of Quicken, Norton AntiVirus or TurboTax would be good for the latter.
  • Gift Cards—Gift cards continue to be great at any price range. $50 could get someone a nice dinner for two or a super nice dinner for one!

Concert Tickets

Wednesday, June 1st, 2011

This weekend I’m heading to see my favorite band in concert, and guess how I got the tickets? Yep, that’s right, a raffle. I’m ecstatic, because the concert was completely sold out. This is the first time I’ll have been to see them play in three years. I would have paid way more than the $5 I did for the raffle ticket.

This is why concert tickets (or event tickets of any type, for that matter) make such a fantastic raffle prize. If you’re located anywhere near a major city, there’s bound to be some concert or event that people are interested in going on at any time. You can pick the event to fit the group of people you plan to sell tickets to. Classical music, rock concerts, folk festivals—you name it. If you plan your raffle far enough in advance, you can buy tickets that will be sold out by the time it rolls around, and people will jump at the chance to win.

Even if the tickets are for a concert that’s not likely to sell out, people will buy them for a chance at a fun weekend they wouldn’t pay full price for. Throw in VIP passes to sweeten the deal if you think it needs it. Depending on the band or event, the organizers might even be willing to donate tickets for a good cause, or at least the VIP passes.

Raffle Prize Ideas Under $25

Wednesday, May 25th, 2011

Raffle prizes don’t have to be expensive. Yes, it’s fantastic if you can afford to raffle off a car, a house or a large amount of cash. But there are plenty of great prize ideas for every raffle budget. This is the first in a series of posts giving suggestions for raffle prizes for specific budgets. Here are some great suggestions for prizes under $25:

  • Movie Tickets–A pair of tickets to a nearby movie theater makes a great raffle prize. Offer tickets to a specific movie if you know your audience well enough or buy an open-ended pass that the winner can use to see a movie of his choice.
  • DVD–If you choose a DVD for a prize, the winner can continue to enjoy it year after year. To make the prize feel a little more substantial, throw in some candy or microwave popcorn.
  • Gift Certificates–You can raffle gift certificates to restaurants, stores or local attractions. When choosing among your options, make sure that the amount you put on the card will buy the winner something substantial. In other words, don’t raffle off a $25 gift certificate to a restaurant that charges $40 for an entree.
  • Toys–Toys are a particularly good prize if your raising money for anything having to do with kids. They’re also particularly attractive to ticket buyers around the holidays. Find out what the latest fads are (silly bands were popular recently) and tempt those parents!
  • Books–Books can be expensive these days, so if you buy new you may only be able to offer one and still keep the price under $25. However, you can often find second-hand books that look just like new at used book stores or online. Choose a theme and offer a few as a package.
  • Alcohol–Most adults would enjoy a good bottle of wine, beer or liquor as a prize. You can get a very nice bottle of domestic wine for under $25, almost any six pack of beer and many bottles of spirits.

Whatever prize you choose, don’t forget that frequently businesses are willing to donate to a good cause. It doesn’t hurt to ask before shelling out the cash. If someone does donate, don’t forget to give them credit on your raffle tickets!

Good Record Keeping: Key to Raffle Success

Thursday, May 19th, 2011

We can’t stress enough how important good record keeping is to running a successful raffle. This is especially important if you’re running a fairly sizable event and so have many tickets and many ticket sellers. If you don’t keep careful track of things, you can quickly find yourself in an awkward position with unpaid-for tickets, misplaced money and unhappy ticket holders. Here are a few tips on keeping things organized.

  1. Buy numbered raffle tickets. That way you can record which tickets you give to which sellers, and they can even keep track of who they sell to.
  2. Make sure you have a solid system for money collection in place. Even the most well-intentioned volunteer seller can forget to turn in money or lose an envelope if you don’t.
  3. Hold a kickoff meeting with your sellers to make sure they know all the rules and prices for the raffle. If they’re confused, your ticket buyers will be, too.
  4. Make sure sellers turn in all unsold raffle tickets when it comes time for the raffle drawing. Make sure that the money you’ve collected is in line with the number of tickets sold.

Taxes on Raffle Prizes

Tuesday, May 10th, 2011

So that $5 raffle ticket really paid off and you’ve won a really valuable raffle prize—money, a car, a house. Congratulations! However, be aware that that raffle prize can bite you in the rear come tax time if you haven’t accounted for it. Believe it or not, raffle prizes are taxable, and when the prize is a big one, the amount you owe can come as quite a surprise.

Now we certainly don’t mean to rain on your parade. We want you to enjoy that prize to the fullest! But the best way to do that is by being fully aware of all the financial implications from the start. Otherwise that parade is likely to end in a thunderstorm come April. Money and prizes won through raffles count as gambling proceeds and must be reported on Form 1040. Of course, sometimes organizations will pay the taxes due as part of a prize, in which case, you’re in luck!

Why Do Raffles Work?

Tuesday, May 3rd, 2011

Raffles are a very simple thing, really. One person pays another person money to gain the possibility of obtaining a prize. But why does this work? Why would anyone ever give good money just for the CHANCE to receive something in return, when you’re guaranteed to obtain something for that same money if you take it to a store? There are at least two strong desires that motivate people to spend money on raffle tickets: a desire to beat the system and a desire for excitement.

First, almost everyone relishes the idea of beating the system. The possibility of getting more than you pay for is hugely attractive people and is the motivation behind many behaviors. People will stand in line overnight to win free food at a Chick-fil-A. Others will buy products that they have no use for just because they have a fantastic coupon in hand. The same motivation sometimes drives people to buy raffle tickets. They’ll gladly pay $10 for a one-in-a-million chance at winning a new house, even though they know they’ll probably never see a return on that money. Just the possibility of getting a house for $10 is overwhelmingly exciting.

And that brings us to reason number two for why raffles work: excitement. The truth is that a lot of people find life very mundane. There’s nothing exciting about going to the store and paying $100 for a vacuum cleaner. But turn that same vacuum cleaner into a raffle prize and add the suspense of having to win it, all of a sudden it’s a lot more interesting. Plus, when you do win, you feel special—like you’ve somehow beaten everyone else.