Posts Tagged ‘organization’

Instant Wine Cellar Raffle

Monday, December 13th, 2010

I just saw an article about a raffle going on in my hometown that I think is a fantastic idea: an instant wine cellar raffle. They’re raffling off two cases of premium wine to the lucky grand prize winner, plus a couple gift certificates to a local restaurant for runners up. As a wine-lover myself, I can’t think of a more fun prize to hop for for the holidays. One $5 raffle ticket, and I could create a wine cellar in one day.

And not only is this a fun idea for a prize, but it is totally customizable to your organization’s budget. If you have a good amount of money to lay out initially on prizes, you can either increase the number of bottles of wine included in the prize or buy better quality wines. Or, you could offer more prizes, so that more ticket holders have a chance at winning. If you’re lucky, you can even find individuals willing to donate a bottle of wine each toward the prize.

When a Raffle Is a Bad Idea

Monday, October 18th, 2010

When is a raffle a bad idea? When it makes you look desperate. Take the case of the Bank of Queensland, which is launching a raffle next month offering account holders a chance to win $20,000 in hopes of luring more people to the bank. As the article notes, this cannot be a good sign for the Australian bank. It suggests desperation, indicating that they can no longer rely on competitive interest rates to attract people. A bank should not in any way resemble a casino.

Raffles are a great way to raise money for a good cause and to provide a bit of fun for members of an organization. But if you’re a reputable financial institution, it’s perhaps not the best way to instill confidence in the public. Make sure that you’re not throwing a raffle as a last ditch effort to save a sinking ship if the ship’s a business. Of course, raffle fundraising for a non-profit can be a good way to garner support for a cause that has not been getting a lot of attention.

Earning Raffle Tickets

Tuesday, September 28th, 2010

The political raffle I wrote about back in August got me thinking about other ways for people to earn raffle tickets rather than buying them. No one ever said that a raffle ticket needs to be given in exchange for cash. For that political raffle, people earned raffle tickets by handing in names of prospective voters. What other types of effort or information might be worth offering raffle tickets for?

It occurred to me that sometimes more than money, non-profits and other organizations need man-hours. For example, do you have a community garden project that you’re trying to get going, but just don’t have enough people working on it to get underway? Offer raffle tickets in exchange for a certain amount of work. The prize could be garden tools, produce from the garden, seeds, or something completely unrelated. Or does your company need market research information? Offer raffle tickets to people who fill out surveys for you.

Raffling Off the President

Monday, September 13th, 2010

Well, not strictly speaking. As far as I’m aware, the President will be staying snugly ensconced in his current domicile. But the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC) are raffling off a chance to meet President Barack Obama. I’d say this one-ups the calf-roping lesson with the lieutenant governor I wrote about last month. Also included in the prize ticket is the opportunity to watch a taping of The Daily Show with Jon Stewart. All you have to do is donate to the campaign before midnight tonight.

By this maneuver, the campaign gets not only your money, but also your contact information. I’d be curious to see how this tactic works for the DSCC. Will they get more small donors than usual? I can hardly think this raffle would tempt anyone into a large donation they did not otherwise intend to make. But again it does help them get contact info. A perfect time for another reminder that it’s always important to know your goals when throwing a raffle. It can be much more than a fundraiser. It’s a great three-in-one device for getting money, phone numbers and raising awareness for a cause. Keep that in mind when designing both your raffle tickets and your publicity campaign.

Flyers for Your Raffle

Friday, June 4th, 2010

Flyers are a great way to advertise your raffle.  It’s really easy just to hang them up where ever you go, but it’s also important to hand them out to people that you are selling the raffle tickets to face to face.  Flyers are one of your greatest tools when selling raffle tickets door-to-door because they can explain all the information about the raffle.

When you are selling raffle tickets, one thing you don’t want to do is overwhelm the buyer with things that your saying.  Keep your pitch short and sweet, and let the flyer fill in all the blanks for you.  As soon as they greet you, hand them a flyer, give them your pitch, and ask them how many tickets they would like to buy.  It’s as simple as that.

Flyers also provide as reminders to buyers after you have already left.  Remember, the main goal of your fundraiser isn’t just to raise money.  It is also to get your cause, business, or organization’s name out there.  Giving people flyers helps to remind them what you are all about, and can possibly draw them in to help in the future.  Take the time to invest in getting flyers made for your raffle ticket selling, and you will not be sorry.

Car Raffles

Thursday, May 20th, 2010

A big prize like a car requires a big raffle.  If you are looking to raise a whole lot of money for your organization, choosing a car as your raffling prize is definitely the way to go.  There are a few things you have to consider though when you are throwing a car raffle.  They are not the easiest raffles to put together.

Most organizations offer a cash prize in place of the car if the winner decides he/she does not want the car.  Also, it’s a good idea to offer a few smaller cash prizes to help you sell more tickets for your organization.  What you don’t want to come across as is one of those car raffles that they hold in almost every mall in America.  You are not out to steal people’s addresses, you are out to raise money for a good cause and you need to make sure people know that.

The car you choose needs to be a desirable car, not just any car.  You will want to work with a dealer to get this car, and offer them lot’s of free advertising to be able to get a good deal on the car.  A plus to going with a dealer is that you can use their client base as possible raffle ticket buyers by mailing them a letter about the raffle and keeping the car your raffling off, along with a sign for your raffle, in their show room where a lot of people will see it.   These are just a few things to consider.