Posts Tagged ‘Non Profit Fundraising’

Raffle Ticket Sales: Working from the Top Down

Wednesday, September 7th, 2011

If you’re really looking to sell as many raffle tickets as you can and raise a significant amount of money for your cause or organization, it’s important to develop a strategy before your sellers set foot out the door. Without such a game plan, you won’t be able to get the full potential out of your fundraising efforts.

One major thing you can do to put your energies to best use is to target community leaders first. Determine who some of the most influential people are locally, then send your best sellers to make the pitch. Not only should you try to get these key players to buy tickets themselves, but you should try to enlist their help in selling more tickets. Even if they’re not willing to appeal to their networks on your behalf, you may be able to get their permission to use their name when approaching other potential ticket buyers. For example, “Mayor Smith himself just bought 20 tickets,” is a great opener.

So who might some of these head honchos be? Local politicians, leaders of religious organizations, school administrators, Rotary Club members and local sports heroes all fit the bill. Talk to your team and see who already has connections with some of these people and begin networking.

Thanking Raffle Donors

Thursday, September 1st, 2011

There are many follow-up tasks to a successfully concluded raffle, from delivering prizes to winners to filling out any necessary legal or tax forms. One item that you should make an effort not to forget is thanking your raffle prize donors. If an individual or organization has been generous enough to give your cause a prize to raffle off, a show of gratitude is definitely in order.

Your gratitude can take many forms: everything from a simple Thank You card to a gift certificate or other small token of appreciation. When choosing your method, keep in mind the nature of the donation as well as of the relationship between your organization and the donor. A thank you to a parent who donates a gift basket to a school fundraiser will probably look different from a thank you to a major corporation that has donated a car to a cancer charity.

Match Your Raffle Prizes to Your Non Profit Cause

Tuesday, August 16th, 2011

When you’re thinking about what items to offer as prizes for your organization’s raffle, it’s a good idea to consider prizes that have something to do with the organization itself. Not only will this help you to start generating prize ideas more quickly, but it is also likely to generate larger raffle ticket sales.

For instance, say you are organizing a raffle for a non profit that helps get kids involved in sports. Who is most likely to be interested in helping out such an organization by buying raffle tickets? People who believe that sports can play a positive role in someone’s life. In other words, people who are interested in sports themselves. So make the tickets even more tempting by offering sports-related prizes.

Make sure to order custom raffle tickets on which you can list the prizes you’re offering. That way, ticket buyers can show their tickets to friends and the prizes are listed right there for them so they don’t need to remember specifics. A little bit of free marketing.

Store Entrances: Prime Real Estate for Raffle Ticket Sales

Wednesday, July 6th, 2011

There are quite a few ways you can go about selling raffle tickets to people who don’t know your organization. One of the best ways for small and large organizations alike is to set up a table at the entrance to a high-traffic location, like a large store or shopping center. Thankfully, this is fairly easy to pull off.

The first thing you need to do is talk to the owner of the location. Explain to them the cause you’re raising funds for as well as talk to them about times to set up a table. (Get them on your side, and they may even be willing to help out with some sort of matching donation.) Aim for times when lots of people will be visiting the location. For instance, if you’re setting up shop at a grocery store, sell tickets on Saturday afternoon or around rush hour during the week when people are making a quick stop for groceries on their way home.

Once you’ve gotten permission to sell, design your stand for success. Make clear, easy-to-read signs on all sides of the table from which large numbers of people are likely to approach. Most people will make the decision to buy or not before ever approaching the table. Explain the cause you’re raising money for as well as the cool prizes. Ask for people’s help.

Finally, make sure whoever mans your stand has a cheery disposition and enthusiasm for the cause. People are much more likely to approach and buy from a happy volunteer than a gloomy employee who’s been roped into it.

State-by-State Raffle Laws

Wednesday, June 22nd, 2011

Raffles, even for charity, are illegal in many states. Before you begin planning one for your organization, make sure you look into the relevant gaming laws. Here we’ve provided links to the most up-to-date information for all 50 states plus Washington, D.C. These laws are subject to change, so we’ve also provided the name of the government body on whose site we found the information.

Good Record Keeping: Key to Raffle Success

Thursday, May 19th, 2011

We can’t stress enough how important good record keeping is to running a successful raffle. This is especially important if you’re running a fairly sizable event and so have many tickets and many ticket sellers. If you don’t keep careful track of things, you can quickly find yourself in an awkward position with unpaid-for tickets, misplaced money and unhappy ticket holders. Here are a few tips on keeping things organized.

  1. Buy numbered raffle tickets. That way you can record which tickets you give to which sellers, and they can even keep track of who they sell to.
  2. Make sure you have a solid system for money collection in place. Even the most well-intentioned volunteer seller can forget to turn in money or lose an envelope if you don’t.
  3. Hold a kickoff meeting with your sellers to make sure they know all the rules and prices for the raffle. If they’re confused, your ticket buyers will be, too.
  4. Make sure sellers turn in all unsold raffle tickets when it comes time for the raffle drawing. Make sure that the money you’ve collected is in line with the number of tickets sold.

Double Win for Police Association Raffle

Monday, December 20th, 2010

Loving this story today. The Centralia Police Officers Association recently raffled off a truck in hopes of raising a small amount of money. But guess what? The man who won the truck (a business owner from out of town) donated it right back! That’s right–not only did they get some money by selling their raffle tickets, but they got to keep the truck for their own use in the community. That’s some serious generosity on the part of the towing company owner who won the raffle.

I really love this idea. I like to buy raffle tickets from charities when I can afford it. They don’t usually cost any more than $20 at most, so I’m not really out much when I don’t win (and who ever expects to?). But say I did win a prize from an organization that I really cared about? It never would have occurred to me to donate the prize right back, but what a great thing it would be. Say the prize is worth something like $1000 (or even more like the truck in this story). That’s like being able to donate all of that money to a cause that I care about for only $20. It doesn’t hurt my budget, and could do so much for an NPO.

Instant Wine Cellar Raffle

Monday, December 13th, 2010

I just saw an article about a raffle going on in my hometown that I think is a fantastic idea: an instant wine cellar raffle. They’re raffling off two cases of premium wine to the lucky grand prize winner, plus a couple gift certificates to a local restaurant for runners up. As a wine-lover myself, I can’t think of a more fun prize to hop for for the holidays. One $5 raffle ticket, and I could create a wine cellar in one day.

And not only is this a fun idea for a prize, but it is totally customizable to your organization’s budget. If you have a good amount of money to lay out initially on prizes, you can either increase the number of bottles of wine included in the prize or buy better quality wines. Or, you could offer more prizes, so that more ticket holders have a chance at winning. If you’re lucky, you can even find individuals willing to donate a bottle of wine each toward the prize.

Attracting Sponsors

Monday, November 22nd, 2010

Unlike with some other forms of fundraising, in order to host a raffle you need to have some money budgeted to begin with. If you really want people to buy your raffle tickets, you need to be able to offer attractive prizes which means spending some cash long before you see any return on your efforts. However, if you put some careful thought into your raffle beforehand, you can often find ways to reduce this initial outlay.

One significant way to save money on your prizes is to find sponsors for your raffle. Individuals or organizations willing to donate their time, money or products to your cause. Of course, the more worthy they consider the cause, the easier this will be. If you’re a non-profit organization, it’ll probably be a lot easier to find sponsors. But you can also create incentive for sponsors by giving them something more in return for their generosity than just your sincere thanks. One very easy way to do this is to include your sponsors’ names on the raffle tickets themselves. This shouldn’t cost you any extra, and it gives your sponsors free advertising. Their name will reach as many people as your fundraising does.

When a Raffle Is a Bad Idea

Monday, October 18th, 2010

When is a raffle a bad idea? When it makes you look desperate. Take the case of the Bank of Queensland, which is launching a raffle next month offering account holders a chance to win $20,000 in hopes of luring more people to the bank. As the article notes, this cannot be a good sign for the Australian bank. It suggests desperation, indicating that they can no longer rely on competitive interest rates to attract people. A bank should not in any way resemble a casino.

Raffles are a great way to raise money for a good cause and to provide a bit of fun for members of an organization. But if you’re a reputable financial institution, it’s perhaps not the best way to instill confidence in the public. Make sure that you’re not throwing a raffle as a last ditch effort to save a sinking ship if the ship’s a business. Of course, raffle fundraising for a non-profit can be a good way to garner support for a cause that has not been getting a lot of attention.